Hands to Feet Pose-Padahasthasana

Hands to Feet Pose

  • Padahasthasana

Padahasthasana (Hands to Feet Pose) is a beginner level asana that is an asana in the Surya Namaskara series. This position is beneficial for treating or avoiding stomach or abdominal illnesses. It lessens excess abdominal weight, enhances digestion, and aids in constipation eradication. The spine becomes more flexible, the blood flow is enhanced, and the spinal nerves are toned. Pada in Sanskrit means "foot," and Hasta means "hands” and asana means “pose” or “posture”. Hands to foot pose can increase blood circulation and let go of extra Vata (air) in your abdomen. Padahasthasana activates the Swadhisthana chakra that helps to maintain flexibility and freedom. 


Steps to do Hands to Feet Pose /  Padahasthasana

  • Stand in Tadasana. Inhale and raise your hands up over the head.
  • Exhale and bend forward keeping your hands and back in one line, without bending your knees or hunching the back. Try to place the abdomen on your thighs.
  • After a few breaths, breathe in and rise up, relax your hands.

Tips for beginners

  • Hold the big toes and pull the torso towards the ground. Interlock hands behind the legs and try to slide the hands along the legs.
  • Place the palms below the feet and try to push the chest towards the knees.

Benefits

  • Increases flexibility of the spine and tones the nerves
  • It helps to eliminate excess belly fat
  • It improves digestion and reduces constipation. It eliminates many stomach ailments.
  • Increases the strength of thigh muscles and calf muscles.

Watch out for

  • It should not be practiced by people suffering from severe back pain, abdominal hernia and ulcer

  • Those who have hypertension, low blood pressure and heart problems should not practice.

  • Practice is prohibited for pregnant women, severe acidity and during the menstrual cycle.


Variations

  • Modern yoga practices have many variations of Padahasthasana using props. 
  • However, this being a self awareness related pose, holding the pose for longer duration itself is an intense variation.